New poll reveals public support for Single Market membership

A new poll, commissioned by the Open Britain campaign, shows that there is large scale support among the public for Britain staying in the Single Market, with 59% of people saying we should stay in the world’s largest trading bloc and only 41% of people wanting to leave it.

 

58% of voters also thought that leaving the Single Market would have a negative impact on the UK economy, while only 30% thought it would have a positive impact and 12% thought it would not make a difference.

The poll also reveals that the continuing ability to trade freely with Europe overrides a desire for significant new immigration controls among a clear majority of voters. 62% of voters would prefer ‘a continuation of the UK’s ability to trade freely with European countries but only limited new immigration controls’, while only 38% of people favoured the hard Brexit solution of ‘significant new immigration controls on European workers but an end to the UK's ability to trade freely with European countries.’

Commenting for the Open Britain campaign, Ed Miliband MP said:

“This poll shows quite clearly that the public see the benefits of the Single Market for our trade and prosperity and want us to stay in it.

"This shatters the central myth of those who want a hard, destructive Brexit that the public are happy to casually wave goodbye to our membership of our largest trading market. They are not.

“This shows why Parliament must have a say on the Government's negotiating strategy for EU exit.

“There is a mandate from the referendum for Brexit. But the extreme Brexiteers in government do not have a mandate, a parliamentary majority, or, we now know, public support for their strategy.

“This is why MPs from across the House of Commons, who supported Leave and Remain, are demanding the Prime Minister starts listening to Parliament and stops trying to bypass it.”

Notes

The poll is an online poll conducted by Benenson Strategy Group for Open Britain, which surveyed 861 adults in the UK between October 12th and 14th 2016.

Immigration Control vs. Free Trade

Respondents to the poll were asked: ‘As part of the UK’s exit from the European Union, the Government must negotiate a new relationship between the UK and the EU. If the government has to prioritise certain issues over others, which of the following outcomes would you rather see?’ When those who answered ‘not sure’ are removed, 62% of people preferred ‘a continuation of the UK’s ability to trade freely with European countries but only limited new immigration controls’, while only 32% opted for ‘significant new immigration controls on European workers but an end to the UK's ability to trade freely with European countries.’

A majority of Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat voters all felt the same, with only UKIP supporters opting for the latter. 50% of Leave voters wanted significant immigration controls but 33% opted for limited controls and continued free trade (17% were not sure). Remain voters split 72-15 the other way (with 14% not sure).

Single Market Membership

Respondents to the poll were asked: ‘As part of the arrangements for the UK leaving the EU, should the UK leave the European Single Market (which is the arrangement which allows businesses to trade freely between the UK and Europe)?’ When those who answered ‘not sure’ are removed, 59% of people did not want us to leave the Single Market and only 41% did.

Again, a majority of Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat voters all felt the same, with only UKIP supporters opting for the latter. More Leave voters wanted us to leave the Single Market but over a quarter of Leave voters wanted us to stay in it. Remain voters overwhelmingly backed staying in it.

Respondents to the poll were also asked: ‘If the UK does leave the European single market, do you believe this will have a positive or negative impact on the UK economy?’ 58% of voters thought that leaving the Single Market would have a negative impact on the UK economy, while only 30% thought it would have a positive impact and 12% thought it would not make a difference.

Again, a majority of Conservative, Labour and Liberal Democrat voters all felt the same, with only UKIP supporters thinking leaving the Single Market would have a positive impact on the economy.



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